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Color Mixing Guides

These colour mixing guides are an indispensable tool for artists and colour designers at every experience level. Showing artists how to mix beautiful, luminous colours. Available in two sizes:

Personal Mixing Guide
• 324 colours created from 18 tube paint colours
• Essential colours for most artists
• Ideal for studio or on location
• Detailed instructions included
• High quality printing
• 11 ½” x 11 ½”
Studio Mixing Guide
• 841 colours created from 29 tube paint colours
• Broader palette and colour spectrum
• Ideal for studio, classroom and art workshops
• Detailed instructions included
• UV coated for durability
• Finest quality printing for colour accuracy
• 24” x 24”

 

Instructions

 

The Guide works on a simple grid system. Dominant colours are shown in the left margin and Mixing colours are shown at the bottom. Where the two colours intersect on the grid is the Target colour you achieve by mixing both colours.

Each Target colour mixture contains only one Dominant and one Mixing colour, plus Titanium White.

Step 1
Select the colour you want to mix from the Magic Palette grid. This is your Target colour.

Step 2
From your Target colour follow the row to the left margin where you will find the Dominant colour. Now, follow the column down to the bottom margin, where you will find the Mixing colour. Using your palette knife, place a dab of each on your palette.

Step 3
The 18 original paint colours are never used straight from the tube. Lighten the Dominant colour and the Mixing colour separately with Titanium White to match the Dominant and Mixing colours illustrated on the guide. Add the white very slowly. Yellows, oranges and reds require no more than 5% Titanium White. Darker colours will usually require slightly more white.

Step 4
Begin mixing the Target colour you originally chose. Using a palette knife start with the Dominant colour and slowly add in the Mixing colour in very small increments. Continue adding the Mixing colour until you match the Target colour.

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List of Colours

 

Personal Mixing Guide:
18 Artist’s Paint Colours and Pigments Produces 324 mixed hues
• Cadmium Yellow Light (Py35)
• Cadmium Yellow Medium (Py37)
• Cadmium Orange (Po20)
• Cadmium Red Medium (Pr108)
• Quinacridone Red (Pv19) Alizarin Crimson (Pr83)
• Magenta (Pr122)
• Dioxazine Purple (Pv23)
• Ultramarine Blue (Pb29)
• Phthalo Blue (Pb15:1)
• Cerulean Blue (Pb35)
• Phthalo Green (Pb36)
• Sap Green (Pb15,Py83)
• Perm. Green Light (Py74)
• Burnt Sienna (Pbr7)
• Raw Umber (Pbr7)
• Payne’s Grey (Pb29,Pbk11,Py42)
• Ivory Black (Pbk9)
• Titanium White (Pw6,Pw4)
Studio Mixing Guide:
29 Artist’s Paint Colours and Pigments Produces 841 mixed hues
• Cadmium Yellow Light (Py35)
• Cadmium Yellow Medium (Py37)
• Naples Yellow
• Yellow Ochre Hue
• Indian Yellow
• Cadmium Orange (Po20)
• Cadmium Red Medium (Pr108)
• Quinacridone Red (Pv19)
• Quinacridone Red
• Cadmium Red Deep
• Alizarin Crimson (Pr83)
• Magenta (Pr122)
• Dioxazine Purple (Pv23)
• Ultramarine Blue (Pb29)
• Cobalt Blue
• Phthalo Blue (Pb15:1)
• Cerulean Blue (Pb35)
• Cobalt Turquoise
• Phthalo Green (Pb36)
• Sap Green (Pb15,Py83)
• Perm. Green Light (Py74)
• Cadmium Green
• Raw Sienna
• Burnt Sienna (Pbr7)
• Indian Red 
• Burnt Umber
• Raw Umber (Pbr7)
• Payne’s Grey (Pb29,Pbk11,Py42)
• Ivory Black (Pbk9)
• Titanium White (Pw6,Pw4)

 

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Frequently Asked Questions

 

  1. What will the guide do for me?
  2. Who is the Guide for?
  3. Will the Guides work in all mediums?
  4. In the instructions, Titanium White has been added to all the tube colours on the chart. Why has white been added?
  5. Why does Titanium White have two different mixes of pigments?
  6. I am having trouble finding some of the paints used on the Magic Palette Colour Mixing Guide. Can you tell me what brand or brands of tube paint were used to create the palette?
  7. Can these charts be used for watercolours?
  8. The dominant and mixing colour series appear to be identical. Is that true?
  9. Sometimes identical colours appear differently when they are supposed to be the exact colour.
  10. Corresponding target colours on either side of the same diagonal should be identical . Correct?
  11. Would the mixing guide help me to determine which colour is warm or cool?
  12. I recently purchased the Magic Palette Mixing Guide. On the list of colours on the back of the guide, cobalt blue and cobalt teal both are listed as having the pigment pb28. Since they are different colours one or both pigments is wrong. What are the correct pigments?

 


 

Question:

1. What will the Guide do for me?

 

Answer:

You will be amazed by your new colour confidence and by using the guide you will achieve the fresh radiant colours you want to mix, easily match the colours you see, see your painting skills improve as you make better colour decisions, and have more fun and success.


 

Question:

2. Who is the Guide for?

 

Answer:

TEACHERS - The Magic Palette Guide is a wonderful teaching tool and an inspiring visual colour reference for students. Your students will find the guide easy to use and will be encouraged to create a whole new range of fresh, radiant colours. 

 

STUDENTS - A world of colour will be at your fingertips. The Magic Palette Guide takes the guesswork out of mixing colours, eliminating trial & error. 

 

BEGINNERS - Don't let selecting and mixing colour intimidate you. The Magic Palette Guide lets you select the colours you want and then shows you how to mix them. It's so simple. 

 

EXPERIENCED ARTISTS - No matter how experienced you are, the Magic Palette Guide will inspire you to broaden your colour palette, encourage you to try new colours, new colour families and new colour combinations. The guide will give you a refreshing new look at your artistic choices. 

 

GIFT GIVING - Give the gift of colour! The Magic Palette Guide makes an amazing gift for your favorite artist.


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Question:

3. Will the Guides work in all mediums?

 

Answer:

The Colour Palette Mixing Guide™ is relevant for all mediums. A number of paint brands were used in creation of the guide because no one brand offered all of the necessary colours. Although there can be some subtle variations in colour by brand, all the artist has to do is visually check their tube colour against our original 18 tube colours and by following the instructions on the back of the chart they will have no difficulty in mixing the colours they want.

The original painting for the guide was created with oil medium, see www.deesolin.com for the "841 Colours" painting.


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Question:

4. In the instructions, Titanium White has been added to all the tube colours on the chart. Why has white been added?

 

Answer:

There are two reasons for adding white. First, many of the colours are transparent so you can't really see the colour without a bit of white. Second, the chart is all about colour and since some of the colours are significantly darker than others, White has been added to bring all the colours closer together in value.


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Question:

5. Why does Titanium White have two different mixes of pigments?

 

Answer:

The formulation of Titanium White varies a bit from manufacturer to manufacturer. However, all quality brands of Titanium White may be used with consistent results. Several manufacturers add a bit of Zinc White (Pw4) into their formula for Titanium White (Pw6) without any change in tinting strength or opacity.


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Question:

6. I am having trouble finding some of the paints used on the Magic Palette Colour Mixing Guide. Can you tell me what brand or brands of tube paint were used to create the palette? The particular colours I am having trouble locating are: Cobalt Turquoise (PB 50). I have found some blues that are (PG 50) but not (PB 50). Other colours include Magenta (PR 122, PB 15); Naples Yellow Hue (PY 43, PY 37, PW6, PW 4); and Indian Yellow (PY 83). I have Not been able to find these formulas anywhere. The instructions indicate that using the same formulas is important.

 

Answer:

To answer this specific question, the colours I used were as follows: Cobalt Turquoise (PB 50) is made by Grumbacher; Magenta (PR 122, PB 15) is by Winton; Naples Yellow Hue (PY 43, PY 37, PW6, PW 4) and Indian Yellow (PY 83) are made by Gambin.


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Question:

7. Can these charts be used for watercolours?

 

Answer:

While the original charts were created in oil, the chart is useful for all pigmented mediums because it illustrates colour relativity and shows you how each of the pigments mix with others. If you look at the list of pigments in the instructions or on the web site where the colours are listed, you can compare these to your paints. If you are using artist quality watercolours, I believe the names are the same or quite similar. (ie: Ultramarine Blue, Cadmium Yellow, etc.)


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Question:

8. The dominant and mixing colour series appear to be identical. Is that true?

 

Answer:

The dominant and mixing colours are the same. Choose any dominant colour and follow the row to the left... each of these colour mixtures will be dominated by the original colour. 

If you choose a mixing colour, and follow the column up, each of those colours will have the mixing colour in it but it will not be the dominant of the two colours. 

For example, Permanent Green with Cadmium Orange has a strong influence of orange in it but it is still more green because Permanent Green is the "dominant colour". Then look at Cadmium Orange with Permanent Green. You can see the green influence in the mixture but the new colour is more orange because Cadmium Orange is the dominant colour.


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Question:

9. Sometimes identical colours appear differently when they are supposed to be the exact colour.

 

Answer:

They should be exactly the same colour. With 4 colour process, sometimes colours print a bit differently. The colour mixing guide will never achieve the clarity and intensity of pure pigment. The guide is a reference to colour relativity. Warm to cool, bright to grey. I mixed a bit of white into most of the colours because many of the tube colours are too dark or transparent to see clearly without white. Some of the mixtures have more white than others. Colour mixing is an art not a science, and this is a guide which hopefully inspires people to think about colour the way musicians work on musical scales. We hope that the Colour Mixing Guides will inspire artists to work with colour the way that musicians work with cords and notes.


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Question:

10. Corresponding target colours on either side of the same diagonal should be identical. Correct?

 

Answer:

The dominant colour will alway have more "power" or dominance in a mixture then the mixing colour.


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Question:

11. Would the mixing guide help me to determine which colour is warm or cool?

 

Answer:

Warm and cool is all relative. The Mixing Guides aren't designed to determine colour temperature. However, generally, reds are the warmest colours and turquoise blues are the coolest. Starting with red, colours become cooler as you move in both directions; toward the oranges and yellows and toward the magentas and purples. If you start with a dominant colour and mix in a cooler colour the resulting mixture will be cooler than the original.


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Question:

12. I recently purchased the Magic Palette Mixing Guide. On the list of colours on the back of the guide, cobalt blue and cobalt teal both are listed as having the pigment pb28. Since they are different colours one or both pigments is wrong. What are the correct pigments?

 

Answer:

The colours used are Gamblin brand artist oil paints. Both Cobalt Teal and Cobalt Blue are the same pigment PB28. They must have been treated differently, perhaps the darker Cobalt Blue has been "cooked"... 

Please feel free to use the chart as a guide and if your pigments are different it's OK as long as the colours match closely.

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